Composition and Perspective Photo Tips

I’ve seen photographs taken with great cameras. They have fabulous colors, perfect exposure and maybe even amazing lighting. But they look ordinary. Why? They lack two big elements: composition and perspective.

These are two of the easiest photo tips you can implement using only your creativity and your eyes. No fancy cameras or technical know-how required!

Photography Tips: A Complete Guide To Composition And Perspective | Learn how to take better pictures by setting up the shot with interesting composition.
Photo Composition and Perspective
To compose {or frame} your shot, you need to look through your viewfinder to see what your camera sees. Then you deliberately place your subject somewhere in the shot. It takes more thought than snapping the picture. While there are many composition rules (all of which may be broken), there is one rule that doesn’t take a huge amount of thought or planning.

Rule of Thirds
Rule of Thirds
Photo Credit: Digital Photography School.
If you’re into art, you may have heard of The Rule of Thirds. Here is how it works: cut the canvas into thirds diagonally and horizontally. The intersecting sections are the “sweet spots” and ideally your subject will fall in or near one of the four intersections. Your goal is to place your subject in one of the red intersections.
rule of thirds

I took this photo of my kids playing in the backyard with my first generation iPhone (aka not the best camera known to man). My older son was balancing himself on the slide and I carefully lined up my shot to try to get him in the upper left-hand “sweet spot”.

(The rest of the photo was to be empty space, but my younger son ran into the frame as I was taking the picture. It was a happy accident because it gave the shot a counterpoint and balanced it out a bit.)

No doubt, even without the happy accident, this shot is more interesting than if I’d placed him squarely in the center of the photo. While a centered subject can make an interesting photo, it’s usually best to avoid the straight-on centered snapshots.

Perspective
If you want your photographs to go beyond just a snapshot, make them tell a story. How can you tell a story? By assuming a different character. In order to do that with your photography, you need to change your perspective.

Here are a few tips and examples of ways you can change your everyday perspective of the subject.

Tip 1: Get Down Low
If you’re taking pictures of flowers, pets, children or anything else that is low to the ground, get low to the ground. The world looks different when you’re sitting, kneeling or on your belly.

Tip 2: Look Up
If you’re photographing something tall, instead of standing back and trying to get it all in the shot, why not get close and look up?

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